Local Summer Events For Kids: The Secret Life of Pets movie event

Local Summer Events For Kids: The Secret Life of Pets movie event

PetSmart is having in store events for the release of the new movie The Secret Life Of Pets Check your local PetSmart for more information. Times may be different at some locations. The events are as follows:

On July 23rd from 12-4pm                             
The Secret Life of Pets
In-Store Event

Max has escaped, this time at PetSmart! Find him with the help of our clues & map for an in-store adventure. Visit 10 different stations throughout the store. First 30 kids to complete the quest receive a prize!

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On June 25th the first 100 kids get a free movie poster, fun photo-op & treat samples for your pets. PLUS, get a free youth movie ticket with purchase.

How To Make: Crayon Hearts

How To Make: Crayon Hearts

All you need is a few boxes of crayons and some silicone heart molds and your ready to go

First thing you need to do is take off the wrappers off the crayons. The easiest way to do that is put them in a bowl of hot water for about 30 seconds. The wrappers will start peeling right away.
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After you have peeled all the wrappers break up all the crayons in small pieces and put a mixture of each crayon in each mold and place all the molds on a cookie sheet.
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Put in the oven for about 12 – 15 minutes at 350. When the crayons are all melted they will be like water, you just need to take the tray out of the oven and let it sit on the counter till they harden up (about a half hour).
Pop them out of the mold and that’s it. You can attach them to a Valentines card or put in a little decorated clear bag to give out.

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Lucky Food For A New Year

Lucky Food For A New Year

For many, January 1 offers an opportunity to forget the past and make a clean start. But instead of leaving everything up to fate, why not enjoy a meal to increase your good fortune? There are a variety of foods that are believed to be lucky and to improve the odds that next year will be a great one. Traditions vary from culture to culture, but there are striking similarities in what’s consumed in different pockets of the world: The six major categories of auspicious foods are grapes, greens, fish, pork, legumes, and cakes.

Grapes
New Year’s revelers in Spain consume twelve grapes at midnight—one grape for each stroke of the clock. This dates back to 1909, when grape growers in the Alicante region of Spain initiated the practice to take care of a grape surplus. The idea stuck, spreading to Portugal as well as former Spanish and Portuguese colonies such as Venezuela, Cuba, Mexico, Ecuador, and Peru. Each grape represents a different month, so if for instance the third grape is a bit sour, March might be a rocky month. For most, the goal is to swallow all the grapes before the last stroke of midnight, but Peruvians insist on taking in a 13th grape for good measure.
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Cooked Greens
Cooked greens, including cabbage, collards, kale, and chard, are consumed at New Year’s in different countries for a simple reason — their green leaves look like folded money, and are thus symbolic of economic fortune. The Danish eat stewed kale sprinkled with sugar and cinnamon, the Germans consume sauerkraut (cabbage) while in the southern United States, collards are the green of choice. It’s widely believed that the more greens one eats the larger one’s fortune next year.

Legumes
Legumes including beans, peas, and lentils are also symbolic of money. Their small, seedlike appearance resembles coins that swell when cooked so they are consumed with financial rewards in mind. In Italy, it’s customary to eat cotechino con lenticchie or sausages and green lentils, just after midnight—a particularly propitious meal because pork has its own lucky associations. Germans also partner legumes and pork, usually lentil or split pea soup with sausage. In Brazil, the first meal of the New Year is usually lentil soup or lentils and rice, and in Japan, the osechi-ryori, a group of symbolic dishes eaten during the first three days of the new year, includes sweet black beans called kuro-mame.

In the Southern United States, it’s traditional to eat black-eyed peas or cowpeas in a dish called hoppin’ john. There are even those who believe in eating one pea for every day in the new year. This all traces back to the legend that during the Civil War, the town of Vicksburg, Mississippi, ran out of food while under attack. The residents fortunately discovered black-eyed peas and the legume was thereafter considered lucky.

Pork
The custom of eating pork on New Year’s is based on the idea that pigs symbolize progress. The animal pushes forward, rooting itself in the ground before moving. Roast suckling pig is served for New Year’s in Cuba, Spain, Portugal, Hungary, and Austria—Austrians are also known to decorate the table with miniature pigs made of marzipan. Different pork dishes such as pig’s feet are enjoyed in Sweden while Germans feast on roast pork and sausages. Pork is also consumed in Italy and the United States, where thanks to its rich fat content, it signifies wealth and prosperity.

Fish
Fish is a very logical choice for the New Year’s table. According to Mark Kurlansky, author of Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World, cod has been a popular feast food since the Middle Ages. He compares it to turkey on Thanksgiving. The reason? Long before refrigeration and modern transportation, cod could be preserved and transported allowing it to reach the Mediterranean and even as far as North Africa and the Caribbean. Kurlansky also believes the Catholic Church’s policy against red meat consumption on religious holidays helped make cod, as well as other fish, commonplace at feasts. The Danish eat boiled cod, while in Italy, baccalà, or dried salt cod, is enjoyed from Christmas through New Year’s. Herring, another frequently preserved fish, is consumed at midnight in Poland and Germany—Germans also enjoy carp and have been known to place a few fish scales in their wallets for good luck. The Swedish New Year feast is usually a smorgasbord with a variety of fish dishes such as seafood salad. In Japan, herring roe is consumed for fertility, shrimp for long life, and dried sardines for a good harvest (sardines were once used to fertilize rice fields).

Cakes, Etc.
Cakes and other baked goods are commonly served from Christmas to New Year’s around the world, with a special emphasis placed on round or ring-shaped items. Italy has chiacchiere, which are honey-drenched balls of pasta dough fried and dusted with powdered sugar. Poland, Hungary, and the Netherlands also eat donuts, and Holland has ollie bollen, puffy, donut-like pastries filled with apples, raisins, and currants.
In certain cultures, it’s customary to hide a special trinket or coin inside the cake—the recipient will be lucky in the new year. Mexico’s rosca de reyes is a ring-shaped cake decorated with candied fruit and baked with one or more surprises inside. In Greece, a special round cake called vasilopita is baked with a coin hidden inside. At midnight or after the New Year’s Day meal, the cake is cut, with the first piece going to St. Basil and the rest being distributed to guests in order of age. Sweden and Norway have similar rituals in which they hide a whole almond in rice pudding—whoever gets the nut is guaranteed great fortune in the new year.
Cakes aren’t always round. In Scotland, where New Year’s is called Hogmanay, there is a tradition called “first footing,” in which the first person to enter a home after the new year determines what kind of year the residents will have. The “first footer” often brings symbolic gifts like coal to keep the house warm or baked goods such as shortbread, oat cakes, and a fruit caked called black bun, to make sure the household always has food.

What Not to Eat
In addition to the aforementioned lucky foods, there are also a few to avoid. Lobster, for instance, is a bad idea because they move backwards and could therefore lead to setbacks. Chicken is also discouraged because the bird scratches backwards, which could cause regret or dwelling on the past. Another theory warns against eating any winged fowl because good luck could fly away.
Now that you know what to eat, there’s one more superstition—that is, guideline—to keep in mind. In Germany, it’s customary to leave a little bit of each food on your plate past midnight to guarantee a stocked pantry in the New Year. Likewise in the Philippines, it’s important to have food on the table at midnight. The conclusion? Eat as much lucky food as you can, just don’t get too greedy—or the first place you’ll be going in the new year is the gym.

Read More at

source: http://www.epicurious.com/articlesguides/holidays/newyearsday/luckyfoods#ixzz1hrd9gFJw

source: epicurious.com

How to Easily Decorate Your Home for Thanksgiving W/ Free Printables

How to Easily Decorate Your Home for Thanksgiving W/ Free Printables

How to Easily Decorate Your Home for Thanksgiving

There are not so many days left until Thanksgiving and, although many of you have already started preparing for Christmas, it wouldn’t be fair not to give the Turkey Day a proper welcome it deserves. Nurturing a thankful heart is something people should strive towards all the time, but it’s always good to have Thanksgiving as a wild card and a second chance to express love and gratitude, if you don’t get the chance to do it as often as you’d like throughout the year.

Now, speaking of holiday decoration, it is amazing what you can do with just a pair of scissors and a little imagination to turn your home into a perfect setting for this traditional feast. The main component of this easy home decor craft is this downloadable sheet of free Thanksgiving printables.

Once you print them out on self-adhesive or regular paper, you can start thinking about the best ideas where you can apply them. For example, you can start with the dining table and use them as food tags, create name cards for your guests or consider using them as personalized utensil holders. If you’re using disposable cups and plates, you can label them with these freebies and make them look more festive.

Thanksgiving printables can also come in handy when preparing dinner invitations, ‘thank you’ cards, Thanksgiving games and other props that will make this year’s holiday one to remember. The holiday labeling craft is not just easy but also one of those activities that all family members can take part in. In the end, holidays are all about family, aren’t they?

Thanksgiving stickers

Giveaway:  Win the new Dvd set The Flintstones and WWE: Stone Age Smackdown

Giveaway: Win the new Dvd set The Flintstones and WWE: Stone Age Smackdown

Enter our giveaway to win the new Dvd set The Flintstones and WWE: Stone Age Smackdown
Check out the app below and take the quiz to find out what Flintstone or WWe Smackdown star you are.
• Download the fun activities – and do them together as a family while you watch the film at home.
• Watch the official trailer

This new video is an entertaining cartoon that kids of all ages will enjoy. Who doesn’t love the Flintstones?!? If you have a child that is a WWE fan then this video is one they will love too.

About The Flintstones and WWE: Stone Age Smackdown
When Fred loses his family’s vacation money, he hatches one of his hair brained plans to get it back. It’s a sports entertainment spectacle that involves throwing his best bud, Barney into the wrestling ring with the likes of John Cenastone (John Cena), Rey Mysteriopal (Rey Mysterio) and even The Undertaker, with Fred himself as event promoter! The crowds roar, the “clams” are pouring in from ticket sales and even Mr. McMagma (Vince McMahon) is taking notice of all the hoopla. Including all-star appearances from The Boulder Twins (Brie and Nikki Bella) Marble Henry (Mark Henry) and Daniel Bry-Rock (Daniel Bryan), it’s time to get the whole family together for hard-hitting, side-splitting laughs from the most epic event in all of prehistory!

#FlintstonesWWE

Own it on Blu-ray Combo, DVD and Digital HD 3/10

• Take the quiz to find out which Flintstones & WWE Stone Age Smackdown Star YOU are?

• Download the fun activities – and do them together as a family while you watch the film at home.
• Watch the official trailer & click the box art to bring the film home today!

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